WHY I DIDN’T COMPLETE MY SUMMER READING LIST

 

imagesAt the beginning of summer I posted a blog detailing my reading goals for the season.   Now that the hours of daylight are dwindling and the leaves are starting to don their autumnal hues, I guess it’s time to see how I did.

Not that great, it turns out.  I had nine books, mostly thrillers, on my to-read list.  I got through three of them and have begun a fourth.  Those completed: Midnight in Europe (Alan Furst), Sand and Fire (Tom Young), and Wayfaring Stranger (James Lee Burke), all of them good.  I’ve posted reviews of each on Goodreads.

SO WHAT ABOUT THIS EBOLA BUSINESS?

http://www.dreamstime.com/-image8272816The deadly Ebola virus has been making headlines recently, especially in Atlanta, Georgia, where two Ebola victims from western Africa will be placed in an isolation unit at Emory University Hospital. Emory, by the way, is adjacent to the main campus of the Centers for Disease Control, the CDC.

Some people are quite concerned that we now have “Ebola in America.” While it’s front-page worthy news, the reality is the situation doesn’t present a threat to the general public. Ebola, though exceptionally virulent, is not easily transmitted. It’s passed from person to person only through close personal contact. You’d have to be exposed to a victim’s blood, urine, vomit, etc., before you’d be a candidate for contracting the disease.

YELLOW BRICK ROADKILL?

Friday I leave for Oklahoma City where my week-long quest for the wily, or sometimes not so wily, tornado will begin.

My wife is absolutely convinced I’m a dead man walking; certain I’ll get swept up like Dorothy and end up as road kill on the Yellow Brick Freeway.

More likely, if conditions ripe for twisters go into hibernation, I’ll die of boredom.

But no matter. My primary goal, believe it or not, is not to get up close and personal with a Great Plains’ monster—-though I’m not averse to that—-but to learn how tornado chasers operate. To see what their daily routine is, what meteorological parameters they examine, what monitoring equipment they employ, and how they communicate with each other during a pursuit.